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These weeks in photos July 25-Aug 8

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Hello!

I’m really enjoying sharing these photos and the awesome feedback I’m receiving from y’all! Thank you for sharing your virtual presence to my blog! Here’s another week through photos. I decided to merge these past two weeks together so here is a quick visual recap!

Downtown Seattle from ferry
Downtown Seattle from ferry

I spent this beautiful day visiting Bainbridge Island which is across the pond from downtown Seattle. Coming back though, I got to bare witness to this epic view full of all shades of blue. I’m falling more and more in love with this city.

Sunset at Golden Gardens
Sunset at Golden Gardens

Well look at that! Another sunset picture! I told y’all that I’m addicted to these breathtaking views. I got a chance to see this sunset with some incredible people while continuously trying to re-light a bonfire. Great times!

Memorial for Japanese Internment Camps on Bainbridge Island
Memorial for Japanese Internment Camps on Bainbridge Island

As I mentioned earlier, I traveled to Bainbridge Island with a group to visit their local museum and to learn more about the Japanese Internment Camps during World War II. Bainbridge was the first site where Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps. It was surreal to be in the space where around 300 Japanese Americans were forced out of their homes all because they “looked like the enemy.” It is quite terrifying to know the depth and history in institutionalizing the “other” or non-white. But what is more terrifying is being kept away from this history and to still bare witness to the othering and therefore exclusion of marginalized communities. There are so many narratives of minorities in this country but what stays somewhat consistent among all of these groups are the ways in which society excludes them. The strategies of continuing to justify the reasons as to why people of color should be treated lesser than. I am thankful to be a part of a collective that looks at the parallels of these histories and identifies not only the oppressors but the system that perpetuates them.

Joyful Seble
Joyful Seble

This week was extra special for me because my beautiful cousin Seble spontaneously made her way to Seattle from Montreal to spend time with her favorite cousin 🙂 This young woman is an absolute wonderful soul who has fused her passions from climate change and environmental justice to living in South America, speaking fluent Spanish and adapting the local dialects and accents from Colombia, Ecuador, Cuba and Nicaragua. Seriously, to be in the presence of this adventurous soul is to travel the world and live life to the fullest! (She’s definitely an inspiration for this blog).

Brunch at Fonte
Brunch at Fonte

Family Sunday brunch at Fonte on 1st ave downtown. Incredible food + service!

Chandelier at ACT Theatre
Chandelier at ACT Theatre

I caught a showing of an awesome play called, “Hold These Truths” that told the story of a young Japanese American man by the name of Gordon Hirabayashi. I will be unfolding more about this in an upcoming post but I highly recommend googling his name and reading about his incredible story as an American fighting to defend his rights. Oh and this was the chandelier I caught a pic of as I was walking out. Such intricate details.

Seble, my beautiful cousin
Seble, my beautiful cousin

I told her I’d be her paparazzi. She didn’t believe me.

Book on Fannie Lou Hamer's life
Book on Fannie Lou Hamer’s life

I just finished an incredible book that was recommended to me that focused on the life of Civil Rights Activist Fannie Lou Hamer. As she famously said she was sick and tired of being sick and tired seeing the daily oppression that she and the black community in Ruleville, Mississippi faced. But what was most inspirational is how to she stood up to do something. She selflessly committed herself to seek change and utilize her rights in getting herself and others registered to vote. What I love was her voice. The way she used her voice. She was not educated, and I don’t bring this up to say, “look what she did without formal education!” I mention this to say that she was unapologetically herself. In the way she spoke, in the way she sang, she was Fannie Lou. She was strong, hopeful, powerful, and gave everything she had. She poured herself into the songs she sang to lift spirits and continue to inspire. I’ve come to realize, as much as she gave, in the process of giving, she was being fueled. She was giving because she knew she was also receiving. Being a spiritual woman, I think she always knew she would be taken care of because she knew it was right for her to continue to fight. Throughout everything she endured, I don’t think she doubted if fighting was that right choice or not. She knew that she had the power to create change and through that she received plenty. Needless to say, she has become a strong idol of mine.

Sculpture at Bellevue College
Sculpture at Bellevue College

I stumbled upon this cool sculpture at Bellevue College. There is always something interesting that I find when I visit this campus.

Rooftop bar, Frolick, with a ping-pong table
Rooftop bar, Frolick, with a ping-pong table

In arriving too early to downtown Seattle for a play, a friend of mine decided to introduce me to this awesome rooftop bar called Frolick. I was mesmerized by the view but also that they had ping pong tables that surprisingly no one was using when we arrived. Sunset, happy hour, good company, and ping pong = a great summer evening!

Those are the photos for these weeks! Stay tuned for more!

l.f.e.

1 comment on “These weeks in photos July 25-Aug 8

  1. Aida, Looks like you are seeing and experiencing and learning and enjoying large swaths of Seattle and environs. I too saw We Hold these Truths and thought it was fabulously written and very powerful!. Gordon Hirabayashi was an amazing individual, but it also made me think about those words…we hold these truths and therefore there’s a much broader conversation to be had.
    Also – lucky you to have shared much of this with your favorite cousin.

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